July 20, 2017

Drastic Changes in the World Wide Web

  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    Drastic Changes in the World Wide Web

    The combinations of Internet Protocol (IP) addresses are expected to run out by the end of January 2012 according to BBC. The Internet will need to utilize a new addressing system. Every computer possesses an IP address that identifies its location on the Web. These IP addresses are unique numbers recognizing the senders or receivers of information across the Internet. Under the current addressing system, Internet Protocol version four (IPv4), there are approximately 4.3 billion IP addresses. However, many of them are reserved for certain purposes such as multicast addresses or local networks, further reducing the number of addresses available for the public. In the 1970s, when the Internet was developing, the 4.3 billion addresses may have been sufficient, but today, the growth of the World Wide Web is both rapidly decreasing the address supply and increasing the need for more.

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    Psychology Students Study Natives in South Dakota

    Having been oppressed and alienated since America was first discovered over five centuries ago, Native Americans have had to overcome many obstacles in order to achieve freedom and acceptance, two things we often take for granted. Twelve students of Dr. Harmon-Vuk

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    Veteran’s Ceremony Recognizes Service

    Veteran’s Day is not only a holiday to celebrate, but a time for us to remember our fallen loved one’s who served our nation like Sgt. Michael F. Paranzino, who was killed in action while protecting our country and civilians in Afghanistan on Nov. 5, 2010.

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    Fall of Man? Work as Punishment for Original Sin

    How should work and workers be treated in this new era of industrialization? On Nov. 16, Dana L. Dudson, Ph.D. and Theology professor of Catholic Social Thought, facilitated a discussion with students in the Slavin Overlook Lounge. The topic for discussion was “The Dignity of Work and Workers in the Catholic Social Tradition.” Dudson admits, “I’m not an expert, but we need to address how to treat our workers.” Advice on the issue, was shared with students based on Catholic Social Teaching, a particular body of teachings written by popes and councils of Catholic bishops since 1891. Students agreed that the importance and influence of workers far precedes encyclicals, and sacred social thought. Even before the Fall of Adam and Eve, humans were created to work. They were created to tend the garden, not to toil or labor but to work. This work was done in participation in God’s own work in Creation. By working, we mimic the work of Creation, and as a result, it makes us more human because work was made for man, not man for work. Dudson emphasizes, “The Fall makes work harder, and now work is necessary for sustenance, but work is not punishment for sin.” Consider the fact that Jesus spent most of his life as a workman, carpentering, and working in ministry. God also works among us, which adds a sense of dignity to us and our own work.

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    Class Time Legislation Strikes Controversy

    With Men’s Soccer at Providence College making national news, it was fitting that Congress hosted Bob Driscoll, Director of Athletics, as their guest speaker at their meeting on Tuesday night. Driscoll gave a brief history of how he came to the College nine years ago from the University of California-Berkeley, and how his goals with Athletics involve helping them to become a well-respected program in the nation, to achieve 100 percent graduation rate among student athletes, and to compete for championships.

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    The Cowl Celebrates Its 75th Anniversary

    On Nov. 16, 1935, The Cowl released its first issue. Six pages of black and white (fewer pages than our Sports section this week!) focusing on football, our rivalry with URI, or State, as it was called back then (sound familiar?), and musings on life at an all-male institution. Providence College and The Cowl have come a long way since then, and we are both pleased and proud to be celebrating our 75 years as this campus’ only student-run newspaper. Dr. McCarthy, O.P., the president of the College in 1935, graced the first page of Volume 1, Number 1 with his blessing, adding, The Cowl may serve another purpose which is scarcely less important than that of developing writers. It may, and it should, foster college spirit.” Through the years, The Cowl has always been the voice of the students as well as the voice of the Providence College community, and has tried to maintain the highest regard for what we accomplish as writers and in portraying the news of our school in an accurate and honest manner. We are ecstatic to be a part of this milestone, and to share in this organization that has been handed down to us, with contributions from so many people who have come before us.

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    CIA Session Sparks Interest Amongst Students

    The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) exudes an air of mystery that both intrigues and sparks interest in the minds of those familiar with it. With strong influence from popular culture, the CIA has become known as a covert and secretive agency of espionage. It is no wonder that many students at Providence College were interested in attending the CIA’s information session sponsored by the Office of Career Services.

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    Students Speak Out on Printing Policy

    Last night, members of Dr. Richard Battistoni’s Ancients and Moderns class and members from Congress held an open forum on the new PC Prints system that was enacted late Sept. Tim Dionisopoulos ’11 opened the forum by explaining how the class was responsible for tackling a pressing issue that is affecting the lives of the student body currently. Pete Van Name ’11 gave a brief background on the PC Prints system, reiterating the fact that the printing policy at the College shifted from an unlimited printing system to a credit system. He stated that administrations primary goal for implementing this change was to reduce printing waste and excess by making students fiscally and environmentally responsible for their actions.

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  • Uncategorized | Nov.18, 2010

    Finding Luck in a Four-Leaf CLOVER

    Harley Evans ’12 / Blog Staff

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  • News | Nov.18, 2010

    Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: A Revealing Report

    Two unnamed sources familiar with a new Pentagon report reveal that more than 70 percent of active duty and reserve servicemen and women would not find a repeal of the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy to be detrimental to morale or current war efforts. The report, due to be delivered to President Barack Obama on December 1, includes the result of a survey sent to over 40,000 troops over the summer, concluding that these soldiers believe that any effect of repealing the policy would be “positive, mixed, or non-existent” to the war effort, reports the Washington Post. The news source concludes that “The survey results led the report’s authors to conclude that objections to openly gay colleagues would drop once troops were able to live and serve alongside them.”

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