July 20, 2017

Congress Updates: March 21, 2013

  • News | Mar.21, 2013

    Congress Updates: March 21, 2013

    The Class of 2013 is preparing for 113 Nights this Saturday night in Peterson, and the Class of 2014 was pleased to announce that Junior Night this past Friday was a great success. The Class of 2015 is finalizing their “Done with Civ” T-shirts and the Class of 2016 is considering planning a bingo night or a glow party. Student Life announced that chicken is now available for flatbread pizzas in Alumni, and they are continuing to work on adding eggplant and more gluten free options to the menu. Legislative Affairs stated that they were in the process of finalizing the legislative calendar. One of the pieces of old business dealt with the proposed Armenian Society. Meghan Keating ’13, chair of the Clubs and Organizations Committee, briefly explained that discussion was held on this club last week and noted that this club would be part of BMSA. There was a motion to vote, and the bill was passed.

    Read More
  • News | Mar.21, 2013

    NYC Sugary Drink Ban Overturned

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s plan to ban large soda and sugary drinks from restaurants and other city venues was overturned on

    Read More
  • Sports | Mar.21, 2013

    Breaking the Brackets

    We have officially hit it, the magical month of the year: March. And with March obviously comes March Madness, which is by far the best yearly sporting event. (I would put it ahead of the Super Bowl, but somewhere behind the Olympics). The time of the year where America is collectively glued to their screens for weeks at a time, trying to soak up the action. This month, heroes will emerge, and a new Cinderella will dance deep into the brackets. And millions of Americans will try to predict the heroes, the Cinderellas, all through their brackets. Millions will fill them out, heatedly and openly debating the fates of schools like the University of Montana, or players as young as 18 years old. Picking a perfect bracket is nearly unheard of, and even picking a pool-winning bracket is immensely difficult. How does one predict the unpredictable? It is a question that not only plagues New England weather experts, but also troubles the minds of millions of Americans.

    Read More
  • News | Mar.21, 2013

    News in Brief

    113 Nights Rescheduled

    Read More
  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.21, 2013

    A Note on Congress’s Funding Allocation Process

    Two issues ago, The Cowl published an article that included concerns regarding Student Congress’ allocation process. I am writing to provide a further explanation of the Student Congress’ allocation process, our methods of communication, and the steps that the body has taken in recent years to improve the allocation process and programming at Providence College. This year, Student Congress has made some substantial changes to the allocation process and clubs/organizations’ procedure, which will prove beneficial for our students in the future. Each year, Student Congress is given $550,000 to allocate to clubs and organizations. With the number of clubs increasing and the allocated amount staying the same, Student Congress is forced to make difficult budgetary decisions and implement regulations that are communicated via the Committee on Clubs and Orgs and Executive Board Training. Additionally, the Executive Treasurer of Student Congress holds a Treasurer Training Session. Clubs meet with the Student Congress during the first weeks of the semester to develop a budget. Line items within a club’s budget are meant to correspond directly to actual events/programs that will occur during the semester. A complete allocations budget is proposed to Student Congress one week and then voted upon the next by members who were directly elected to represent their class. The entire process is public and students are invited to attend and advocate for changes in budgets. Also, The Cowl publishes a weekly Student Congress update. Student Congress is committed to ensuring that students get the most for their money. I encourage all those who want more input on allocations to join us in the process by contacting their class representatives, coming to a meeting, or themselves running for a position on Student Congress.

    Read More
  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.21, 2013

    World Water Week: Think Outside the Bottle

    While a large portion of the world desperately seeks clean drinking water, developed nations such as the United States spend billions on bottled water even though clean tap water is available. The growing bottled water marketing industry has turned us against tap water, while in fact 40 percent of bottled water is actually tap water from municipal sources. Americans are willing to pay 10,000 times the cost of tap water for the privilege of drinking an inferior product. Bottled water is not held to the same standard testing as tap water and is not tested for E.coli. Unlike tap water, bottled water isn’t required to produce quality reports or even provide its source. The other 60 percent of your bottled water comes from privatized sources, often in third-world nations. Large corporations such as Nestlé or Coca Cola take advantage of poorer communities and buy up their water supply simply to make a profit. While you may believe that your bottled water comes from the bubbling glaciers of the Alps, it is more likely to have been stolen from a poor Bolivian village. The locals cannot afford the high prices of the privatized water and become victims to the prices of merciless corporations. It is an injustice that water is stolen from these third-world villages and sold to rich first-world nations in the form of bottled water! The Vatican has also spoken out against the use of bottled water, as water is a right to life.

    Read More
  • News | Mar.21, 2013

    Falkland Islanders Decide Their Destiny Democratically

    n an unprecedented, though not unexpected, vote this past week, the Falkland Islands voted almost unanimously to remain a British Overseas Territory. The British government, as a way to settle a long-term sovereignty dispute, supported the referendum. The vote saw a 92 percent eligible voter turnout rate, with 99 percent of these voters stating that they wished to remain a British territory. The Islands have long been the focus of territorial and sovereignty disputes. The British Crown is said to have laid claim, and thus sovereignty, in 1765, but abandoned the territory due to economic concerns in the late 18th century. Despite abandoning the island, the claims to sovereignty were never officially relinquished. In the decades that followed, physical control of the territory passed from the French to the Spanish, and eventually the Argentinians, who claimed sovereignty in 1820. This sovereignty was challenged a decade later when the British exercised their sovereign control of the area, evicting Argentine troops and creating a permanent settlement.

    Read More
  • News | Mar.21, 2013

    St. Patrick’s Day Returns to Campus

    From the shamrock cutouts adorning the walls of Ray to the flocks of students traversing campus clad in emerald green, Providence College celebrated St. Patrick’s Day last weekend.

    Read More
  • News | Mar.21, 2013

    Heeding the Call:

    On the same day that the Church was blessed with the election of Pope Francis, I learned that I had been accepted into a superlatively beautiful, holy family. The greatness of what I have consented to join so surpasses even my most quixotic aspirations that until recently, I could never believe I would be writing these words. I will become a member of St. Dominic’s family this coming August when I enter the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia in Nashville, Tenn. Maybe you’re thinking, “This is kind of a TMI moment,” but I think that you should keep reading, because goodness diffuses itself, so I can’t help but share. Perhaps the most prominent characteristic in the newly-elected pontiff was his profound humility and evident admission of his total unworthiness before the task at hand. The truth is that none of us are worthy of the blessings that God has bestowed on us. I’m not writing to say that you really shouldn’t be surprised that I’m going to become a Dominican Sister, because I may be more surprised than anyone else. A reference to the title of C.S. Lewis’ autobiography is fitting here because I have been thoroughly “surprised by joy.” How can we explain the numerous gifts that God freely offers to us except to point to the words of St. John: “Not that we have loved God, but that He loves us” (1 John 4:10). Herein lies our Hope, which is truly “the anchor for the soul” (Heb. 6:19). As you may know, “hope” is the state motto of Rhode Island, and of course, Veritas is our own motto at PC. Our hope is in the Truth, who is the Person of Jesus Christ. Maybe you think that this sounds great in a theology class, but there’s a so-called “hard reality” to consider too. The best part about theology, though, is that it’s not just an abstract discipline for academics. Rather, when we learn about Grace in the classroom, we learn what it means to be human, because the only person who can tell us what to do after we walk out of college is God. This isn’t a surprise at all. We sing psalms at Mass to this effect and most of us go weekly to receive the Eucharist. Either Jesus Christ died to save us from our sins and thus enabled us to spend eternity with Him, or not. There is no other option. I don’t know about you, but I think that this is kind of a big deal! I offer my story to you now as proof that there’s always hope, albeit in unexpected ways and places. If you plan on graduating without asking God what He wants you to do, you’re deceiving yourself. You see, he made us for Himself and for each other, not for ourselves.

    Read More
  • News | Mar.21, 2013

    PC’s Mock Trial President Is a YouTube Star

    If one person possesses the most experience under his belt with mock trial, it is Taylor Rosenbauer ’14. This New Jersey native, who transferred from Stonehill College in Easton, Mass. after his freshman year, knew that the first thing he wanted to do when arriving at PC was to join the mock trial team. After being on PC’s team for only one year, he was then voted president, which he describes as rewarding. Rosenbauer, a double major in political science and philosophy, has been involved with mock trial since his freshman year of high school. His friend told him that he should become involved with this activity and Rosenbauer admitted, “I had no idea at first what it was all about.” While on mock trial in high school, his team won the county competition every single year, won regionals twice, was fourth in states, and attended the national competition. In a mock trial competition, each team prepares both sides of the case: prosecution and defense (criminal case), and the plaintiff and defense (civil case). There are three lawyers and three witnesses on each team, and all the teams competing work on one specific case throughout the whole season. The team spends months preparing, first only meeting once a week and then increasing to twice a week with members also meeting outside to practice their case. Skills that the team works on for competitions include cross-examinations, opening/closing statements, and learning to think on one’s feet.

    Read More