November 17, 2019

Posts from "Arts & Entertainment"

  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.21, 2012

    Why We Feast on The Hunger Games

    Not 24 hours after I arrived home, the grumbling started. It began after an encounter with an old teacher who was preaching the sustaining value of the novel. As I discussed my piqued appetite with my little brother, his eyes craved the arrival of tomorrow afternoon when his piece would arrive in the mail. It continued the next day as my aunt and cousin both expressed their fulfilled satisfaction. In short, The Hunger Games was starting to make me hungry.

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.07, 2012

    PC and Brown Come Together in Musical Tribute

    The preparations for the concert tribute to Ruth Simmons, president of Brown University for 11 years, began months ago, and due to the grand logistics of the event, they certainly needed to. The plan was ambitious: to combine singers from Providence College and Brown University with a full symphonic orchestra to perform the entirety of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9. This is a piece known for its complexity and large number of instrumental and vocal solos, and for its famous fourth movement, known to many as “Ode to Joy.”

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.07, 2012

    Editor vs. Editor

    Favorite Spring Break Destination: Barcelona, Spain

    His Thoughts: Having taken four years of Spanish in high school, I am eager to flex my linguistic muscles over spring break.

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.07, 2012

    Lucky Us: Thank the Irish on March 17th

    5) The Departed

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.07, 2012

    Project X Throws a Bad Party

    The ‘70s discovered the party movie as a reliable source of humor, drama, and satire of teen culture with Animal House, and the genre was gloriously revived in the 21st century with Superbad and taken to new extremes with The Hangover. Though Project X, incidentally produced by Hangover director Todd Phillips, claims to be the ultimate party movie, it painfully fails to live up to the cleverness and sincerity of its predecessors.

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.07, 2012

    7 Things to Do Near Providence: Springtime Edition

    With the sun out, the temperatures rising, and the revelry of break on the near horizon, the hope of spring is back in the air! Although the winter was nothing too abominable, the opportunities for outdoor fun were still limited by chilly nights and the occasional storm. As the warmer months grow closer, put a little spring in your step and try a few of the following recommendations for springtime fun. Switch up your weekly routine with less Providence Place movies and Federal Hill dinners. Here are seven spring-inspired activities that will keep you moving through the last few months of school.

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.07, 2012

    Textile Art, Tees, and Taking Initiative: Students Start Serengetee

    Say it: Serengetee. Doesn’t it roll off the tongue? College-aged individuals from around the nation joined together to start this charitable clothing company, in hopes of making a global impact. Led by Jeff Steitz, a junior at Claremont McKenna College, a group of about 25 students work behind-the-scenes on everything from advertising to communication with charities to production planning and distribution. Providence College can be proud to claim two of its own as being a part of this innovative organization.

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.07, 2012

    PYSCHO for Alfred Hitchcock

    All of us know the infamous shower scene from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, in which Janet Leigh is stabbed to the suspenseful music we all associate with horror movies now. We are also all familiar with James Bond, but not many of us know that he wouldn’t be where he is today without Hitchcock’s North by Northwest. Hitchcock’s angle and camera technique of mimicking a person’s gaze is still frequented in films today.

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.01, 2012

    A Dangerous Method Probes the Depths

    There is rarely a film that compels me to actually go to the movies, but as soon as I saw the trailer for A Dangerous Method, I knew I had to see it. David Cronenberg’s new film explores the psychological world in the early 1900s, focusing on a forbidden relationship between psychologist Carl Jung and patient Sabrina Spielrein. Jung (Michael Fasserbender) is treating Spielrein (Keira Knightley) for a distressed condition, perhaps a nervous breakdown. He attempts to experiment with Sigmund Freud’s (Viggo Mortensen) idea of “the talking cure.” This idea is known as psychopathology, or therapy as we look at it today. Although psychology has changed since Freud’s initial introduction, it is essentially the idea of patients using conversation as a catharsis and healing themselves by working out their issues verbally. Although we are now used to this idea, in 1900, it was considered radical. Before Freud, hysteria was treated with hypnosis or even electric shock therapy.

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  • Arts & Entertainment | Mar.01, 2012

    Gotye: Somebody That We Should All Know

    Belgian-born Australian Wouter De Backer recently found himself thrust into international stardom when his one-man band Gotye produced the album Making Mirrors, which contains the unsuspecting gem “Somebody That I Used to Know.” This distinctively quirky and terribly catchy break-up song has proved appealing to an extremely broad range of listeners, regardless of their customary musical tastes and preferences. It’s even a regular on the Concannon Fitness Center soundtrack, a playlist that usually features only the most popular mainstream songs. Admittedly, Gotye may be a new discovery for me, but I’m more than happy to cheerfully and wholeheartedly jump on the bandwagon.

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