June 20, 2019

Posts from "Opinion"

  • Opinion | Nov.18, 2010

    Diversity At PC:Part One

    I’m always stunned by the Providence College administration’s dual approach to the issue of diversity. On the one hand, they’re quite prepared to promote it, with the full force that their mountains of cash afford them. On the other hand, recent decisions, particularly regarding the Balfour Center, have shown that they actively discourage it. For me, the problem lies in the actual definition of diversity.

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  • Opinion | Nov.18, 2010

    Diversity At PC:Part Two

    When talking about diversity at PC, or lack thereof, it is important to keep in mind what is actually being referred to. It is true that the population here primarily consists of Caucasian students. But, in fact, diversity is not solely determined by the color of a student’s skin. Diversity is simply defined as unlikeness or variety. This does in fact exist at PC.

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  • Opinion | Nov.18, 2010

    Diversity at PC:Part Three

    Does PC have a diversity problem? Well yes, obviously. This goes without saying. But the word “problem” in this question is up for debate. It’s easy to place blame on the administration for not accepting the right balance of students. It’s easy to blame the applicants; maybe the right students aren’t applying.

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  • Opinion | Nov.11, 2010

    Don’t Leave Us, Harry

    You all know him. You have all read about him, watched his movies, played his videogames, and perhaps even travelled to his wizarding world at universal studios. He is Harry Potter, the boy wizard who has captivated all of our imaginations since we were children. I can remember the first time I saw Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone when I was in fifth grade. I walked out of the theatre speechless and enchanted by the world of Hogwarts. For many years to follow, the books and the films have continued to bring our imaginations to places we never could have dreamed up on our own. J.K. Rowling has inspired us to laugh, cry, and cheer for her beloved characters, Harry, Ron, and Hermione.

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  • Opinion | Nov.11, 2010

    Faith Matters

    When a person with whom we don’t have a particularly strong connection dies, our reaction to the news tends to be superficial. We shake our heads, offer some kind of verbal response (“what a shame . . . his poor family”) and then get back to the ordinary business of life. I don’t know if it’s a defense mechanism or what, but when we don’t know the deceased, we tend to shrug off the news — however tragic — and resume our lives. We don’t allow the death to really affect us.

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  • Opinion | Nov.11, 2010

    Ilg ’14 Responds To Bash Of PC Hockey Fans

    My article for this week was going to be about how I despised the sport of basketball, until the student enthusiasm, as exhibited during Late Night Madness, changed my attitude. But after reading my fellow staff writer’s article last week, I feel as though it is imperative that I directly address her opinion. Beatriz Forester ’14 wrote about the disgraceful behavior of the enthusiastic students cheering on our hockey team. I am here to report, one week later, that Beatriz could not have gotten it more wrong. I, too, attended a Men’s Hockey game, and I found hardly any validity in what she has written.

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  • Opinion | Nov.11, 2010

    Tangents & Tirades

    All Bro-ed Out. Sometimes I feel like I live in Bro-Nation. It seems the male population at Providence has been overtaken by “Bro Fever.” Why is it that so many guys feel the need to wear their pants half-way down their legs, the expected flannel plaid shirt, the predictable flat brimmed hat, and Rainbows? If we’re lucky, they may be sporting board shorts or Ugg slippers. They place the word “dude” before most sentences, and their priorities include “chillin” and “bro-ing out.” Calm it down with the incessant playing of Dave Matthews Band and looking for new stickers for your truck. Stop yelling about how “awesome” everything is at your party. And definitely stop expecting girls to flock to you because you stand in a strategically placed position, lightly flexing your biceps in the corner. “Bros” are tools, and once you leave Providence College, the “bro” lifestyle is not going to fly. — Ally Pelle ’11

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  • Opinion | Nov.11, 2010

    Tiffany & Earl

    Dear Tiffany and Earl,

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  • Opinion | Nov.11, 2010

    Parents Responsible For Children’s Health, Not Government

    The McDonald’s Happy Meal is a staple at the golden-arched restaurant, an option enjoyed by children across the country. However, this combo meal is now under heavy fire in San Francisco. Looking to curb the issue of childhood obesity, San Francisco city officials have made steps toward banning the inclusion of a free toy with a meal that does not meet certain nutritional guidelines. In essence, the government is forcing parents into giving their children healthy food, should they want to buy a Happy Meal. By the sound of it, there is no education going on here, no attempts at ensuring a lifestyle change to make eating healthy food a life-habit that will follow children into adulthood.So, really, how effective could this ban be in combatting childhood obesity? Is something like this wholly necessary? Is the real solution to the problem further education on the importance of healthy living, without an alluring plastic toy clouding the judgments of parents?

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  • Opinion | Nov.11, 2010

    The Days the Music Died

    If you ask my dad, he’ll tell you that the first few years of his life were in black and white. A transistor radio allowed him to see in color. He was walking to school, radio in hand, when four guys from England came on and opened his eyes. “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” made the world come alive for my father. It was as if the black and white outlines of his youth suddenly took color, or so he says, anyway. I’m one of those people that think The Beatles changed the world; perhaps I take after my dad. However, I don’t think it’s fair to deny the profound influence artists such as Bob Dylan and The Beatles had and continue to have on society. These days, I think things are becoming more and more black and white. For the most part, I find myself looking to Radiohead, Kurt Cobain, and a slew of other musical visionaries of the past in order to keep my world in color. I “believe in rock and roll, and that music can save the mortal soul”—at least it used to be able to. Somewhere along the way, it seems the music died. As for the exact day that it perished, well that’s the question. Perhaps it was the day John Lennon was murdered, or maybe the day Simon and Garfunkel called it quits for good. On second thought, maybe it was on….

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