College Endorsements

by Sarah McLaughlin '23
Editor-in-Chief


Friar Sports


What It Means Now for College Athletes

Ben Bilotti ’23

Sports Staff

On Jun. 30, the NCAA approved a policy known as names, images, or likeness (NIL), a deal that will allow college athletes to profit off their name, image, and likeness.

The president of the NCAA, Mark Emmert, was quoted saying, “This is an important day for college athletes since they are now able to take advantage of name, image and likeness opportunities.”

Since the approval of the policy, many college athletes all over the country have profited in some way or another. Many athletes are partnering with local small businesses while others are creating their own merchandise lines or getting involved in commercials.

Jackson State defensive end Antwan Owens was the first to take advantage of the new policy. As soon as the clock struck midnight and the policy was official, Owen signed a deal with Three Kings Grooming.

Some believe female athletes will have more chances to profit off of NIL given many of their impressive social media followings.

Hanna and Haley Cavinder, known as the Cavinder twins, are a perfect example of female athletes who have a major opportunity to make the most of the NIL policy.

Across TikTok and Instagram, the twins collectively have over 3.8 million followers. They have since been able to partner with Boost Mobile and Six Star Pro Nutrition.

LSU gymnast Olivia Dunne is another female athlete who is expected to make a lot of money from the NIL rule changes.

She has 4.4 million followers on TikTok and 1.3 million on Instagram. Dunne is likely going to earn more compensation than any other athlete.

In August, Dunne signed to be represented by WME Sports. Not long after, on Sept. 14, she announced her first NIL Brand Deal with an activewear company, Vuori, with whom she will take part in marketing campaigns over the next two years.

The Vuori deal includes promotional photoshoots, social media takeovers, and in-person events. It is rumored that the deal is in the “mid six-figures.” Many believe Dunne will be the first student-athlete to reach $1 million in NIL deals.

Providence College is doing their part to help student-athletes reach their full earning potential.

On Aug. 8, the Providence College Athletic Department launched a program to assist athletes with education, protection, and monetization of their name, image, and likeness.

The platform is called AdvantEdge and is powered by Opendorse. The platform will be administered through the Friar Edge student development program.

PC’s Women’s Basketball head coach Jim Crowley said, “Our players will be positioned well in this new environment with the education and resources they need to build their brand and take advantage of the opportunities that are ahead of them.”

PC’s Men’s Basketball head coach Ed Cooley also stated how pleased he was with the addition of Opendorse.Providence College Men’s Basketball center Nate Watson is a student-athlete who is in a great position to be compensated for his NIL.

Nate Watson
Photo Courtesy of Fox News

Watson has over 51,000 followers on Instagram and over 680,000 followers on TikTok. Watson has already partnered with PSD Underwear and Playmaker. He has also launched an account on Cameo where anyone can request a personalized video from Watson.

The new NIL rule changes are a huge step in the right direction for student-athletes.

Even athletes from smaller schools have the opportunity to be compensated and partner with brands.

These partnerships are expected to be beneficial to both student-athletes and the brands with which they sign;  student-athletes will be compensated for their hard work and companies will expand their name-recognition.

The future is bright for NCAA athletes.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.