Celebrating Fr. Thomas McGlynn , O.P.

by The Cowl Editor


Arts & Entertainment


An Inspiration to Dominicans and Artists Alike

by: Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

Martin de Porres statue exhibit
NORA JOHNSON ’20 / THE COWL

Providence College and the Dominican community celebrated the feast day of the beloved Saint Martin de Porres, Dominican friar and the patron saint of interracial harmony on Nov. 3. Saint Martin  de Porres has been celebrated, in particular, at PC in the Center for Catholic & Dominican Studies, where Father Thomas McGlynn, O.P.’s, artwork and sculptures depicting St. Martin have been on display since July and will continue to be displayed until December.

St. Martin de Porres was a revered healer during the 17th century in Peru. While living in the El Rosaria priory in Lima, he healed ill Dominicans. Later on, he would travel throughout Peru to heal the sick and poor. 

The birth of St. Martin was a scandal, as his father was a Spaniard and his mother a freed woman from Africa. He was raised by his mother and was expected to exceed as a child because of his mixed race. Eventually, he found a home in the El Rosaria priory as a donado, a position allowing him to live with the Dominicans in return for performing simple tasks. 

The friars of the community noticed the patience, steady temperament, and solicitude that Martin showed toward the sick. Despite some prejudiced friars, the Dominican community disregarded Peruvian laws restricting those of African descent to become members of the religious community. Martin, therefore, professed his vows to become a religious lay-brother in the Dominican priory. 

He was assigned to the infirmary where he cared for the ill, gaining a reputation for having incredible patience and also miraculously healing the sick. St. Martin would later go on to travel throughout Lima to care for the sick who could not afford medical care.

Among one of the many people touched by the life of St. Martin de Porres was Dominican friar and sculptor Fr. McGlynn. Fr. Thomas More Garrett, O.P., custodian of the St. Martin de Porres collection at PC, says, “The story of St. Martin de Porres’ life sparked a healing at the level of the soul, which then bore fruit in creativity. Their meeting illustrates the coming together of race and grace.” 

Fr. McGlynn grew up in a generation which was incredibly prejudiced towards African Americans. However, Fr. McGlynn’s meeting with St. Martin changed his perspective on African Americans, inspiring him to sculpt and produce images of the beloved saint. 

In a sculpture displayed on campus, St. Martin is depicted as a saintly combination of “physical strength and saintly disposition,” says Fr. Garrett. The crucifix and broom represent his deep love for God and service to the community. The first version of the sculpture includes a mouse, symbolizing St. Martin’s affection with simple creatures. There are two different versions of the sculpture on PC grounds, one in front of St. Martin Hall and another at the koi pond on lower campus.

The PC community has been blessed with Providence College Galleries staging St. Martin de Porres: An Inspiration to Priest & Sculptor Thomas McGlynn. St. Martin has left an “indelible stamp on the aesthetics of the Dominican tradition and, by extension, the Providence College community” says Jamilee Lacy, director & chief curator of Providence College Galleries and Collection. 

It is through the art that McGlynn has created that the works of St. Martin can continue to be remembered—especially on the PC campus. 

 

Celebrating Fr. Thomas McGlynn , O.P.

by The Cowl Editor


Arts & Entertainment


An Inspiration to Dominicans and Artists Alike

by: Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

Martin de Porres statue exhibit
NORA JOHNSON ’20 / THE COWL

Providence College and the Dominican community celebrated the feast day of the beloved Saint Martin de Porres, Dominican friar and the patron saint of interracial harmony on Nov. 3. Saint Martin  de Porres has been celebrated, in particular, at PC in the Center for Catholic & Dominican Studies, where Father Thomas McGlynn, O.P.’s, artwork and sculptures depicting St. Martin have been on display since July and will continue to be displayed until December.

St. Martin de Porres was a revered healer during the 17th century in Peru. While living in the El Rosaria priory in Lima, he healed ill Dominicans. Later on, he would travel throughout Peru to heal the sick and poor. 

The birth of St. Martin was a scandal, as his father was a Spaniard and his mother a freed woman from Africa. He was raised by his mother and was expected to exceed as a child because of his mixed race. Eventually, he found a home in the El Rosaria priory as a donado, a position allowing him to live with the Dominicans in return for performing simple tasks. 

The friars of the community noticed the patience, steady temperament, and solicitude that Martin showed toward the sick. Despite some prejudiced friars, the Dominican community disregarded Peruvian laws restricting those of African descent to become members of the religious community. Martin, therefore, professed his vows to become a religious lay-brother in the Dominican priory. 

He was assigned to the infirmary where he cared for the ill, gaining a reputation for having incredible patience and also miraculously healing the sick. St. Martin would later go on to travel throughout Lima to care for the sick who could not afford medical care.

Among one of the many people touched by the life of St. Martin de Porres was Dominican friar and sculptor Fr. McGlynn. Fr. Thomas More Garrett, O.P., custodian of the St. Martin de Porres collection at PC, says, “The story of St. Martin de Porres’ life sparked a healing at the level of the soul, which then bore fruit in creativity. Their meeting illustrates the coming together of race and grace.” 

Fr. McGlynn grew up in a generation which was incredibly prejudiced towards African Americans. However, Fr. McGlynn’s meeting with St. Martin changed his perspective on African Americans, inspiring him to sculpt and produce images of the beloved saint. 

In a sculpture displayed on campus, St. Martin is depicted as a saintly combination of “physical strength and saintly disposition,” says Fr. Garrett. The crucifix and broom represent his deep love for God and service to the community. The first version of the sculpture includes a mouse, symbolizing St. Martin’s affection with simple creatures. There are two different versions of the sculpture on PC grounds, one in front of St. Martin Hall and another at the koi pond on lower campus.

The PC community has been blessed with Providence College Galleries staging St. Martin de Porres: An Inspiration to Priest & Sculptor Thomas McGlynn. St. Martin has left an “indelible stamp on the aesthetics of the Dominican tradition and, by extension, the Providence College community” says Jamilee Lacy, director & chief curator of Providence College Galleries and Collection. 

It is through the art that McGlynn has created that the works of St. Martin can continue to be remembered—especially on the PC campus. 

 

Fall Choir Concert

by The Cowl Editor


Arts & Entertainment


by: Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

Fall Chorus Concert two female singers clapping
 ISABELLA BAFFONI ’23 / THE COWL

On Sunday, November 3, the Providence College Department of Music presented “An Hour of Choral Music,” conducted by Fr. Vincent Ferrer Bagan, O.P., and accompanied by Michael Kregler on the piano. The hour-long concert in the Ryan Concert Hall of the Smith Center for the Arts, filled with traditional Christian psalms, Gregorian chants, and African-American spirituals was a breathtaking success.

The Concert Chorale is a large mixed ensemble open to all students interested in singing at PC. The group reflects the diverse music interests and talents present on campus. I Cantori is the premier choral ensemble of PC. The singers consist of both full-time, undergraduate music majors, and non-music majors. These students are committed to innovative and quality performances and reaching the ears of others through choral music. 

On Sunday, the two music groups collaborated to put together a fall concert, including performances of pieces by di Lasso, Brahms, Elgar, Rene Clausen, and Michael Kregler. They also performed a lively and engaging arrangement of African-American spirituals by Andre Thomas and Moses Hogan. The groups sang a diverse music selection, giving both choirs an opportunity to synthesize traditional, Renaissance, spiritual, and ethnic pieces of music. 

Concert Chorale opened the show and impressed the audience with their impeccable ability to perform pieces in Latin. “Salmo 150” exposed the liturgical music tradition to the audience. The choir continued with a Mode VI chant entitled “Ave Verum Corpus.” After performing three pieces in Latin, Fr. Vincent introduced an African-American spiritual piece “My Good Lord’s Done Been Good Here.” This piece, written by Andre J. Thomas, originated from an oral tradition that imparted Christian values while describing the hardships of slavery. “African-American spirituals are a lot of fun to sing and an important part of the American choral repertoire,” says Fr. Vincent. The choir sang the passionate lyrics soulfully, invoking feelings of hope and joy, pondering the many milestones African-Americans have overcome throughout history. 

Following Concert Chorale’s performance, the combined choirs took the stage to perform a Spanish song, “El Rio,” describing a celebration which takes place yearly in Colombia in preparation for Ash Wednesday. The upbeat tempo of the song, including drums, clapping, and dancing, engaged the audience in the performance. Next, the choir sang perhaps the most beautiful piece of the night—a love song entitled, “O My Luve’s Like a Red, Red Rose.” This piece, written by Rene Clausen, a professor of music at Concordia College, was written as a gift for his wife on Valentine’s Day. He recorded his students performing it, and presented it to her when returning home from work. The sopranos, altos, tenors, and basses all harmonized beautifully.

To close the night, I Cantori presented three more Latin pieces, including a Mode VIII chant, a piece based off of a passage from Leviticus, and three Psalm pieces. They also performed the famous “Simple Prayer” of Saint Francis, composed by Charles Forsberg, in an attempt to display that life is not about doing good for personal gain, but doing good for others.

Fr. Vincent was “pleased with the performance, and feels that the singers and audience were as well. It was a shorter performance than what [they’ve] generally done, which allowed [them] to focus on honing and memorizing a smaller amount of repertoire.” 

Both choirs will join with Campus Ministry choirs for the annual Lessons and Carols service in St. Dominic Chapel—this year on Saturday, December 7. Fr. Vincent is always looking for more singers, so anyone interested in joining can contact him at vbagan@providence.edu or talk to any of the singers.

Seniors Celebrate 220 Night

by The Cowl Editor


On-Campus


Kick Off Final Year of Festivities

by Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

BRIANNA COLLETTI ’21/THE COWL

On Friday, September 27, Student Congress hosted 220 Night, a dance for the senior class marking a countdown of 220 nights until graduation. This has been a Providence College tradition for generations, and seniors came dressed in formal attire to kick off the start of a year to remember. 

Tickets went on sale Monday morning, but the majority of students waited until Friday to storm the ticket office. Wristbands were also offered to students over the age of 21 so that they could buy signature drinks at the bar.

The doors opened at 8:30 p.m. In true Friar spirit, Congress decked out Peterson Recreation Center in silver, black, and white. Cocktail tables were scattered around the gym with tea lights inside of glass mason jars that looked like silver glitter. Elizabeth Connor ’20 “loved how Congress was able to transform the gym into a magical ballroom.”

The bar served a variety of drinks, from Coronas to Bud Lights to hard seltzers. “The hit drink of the night was the signature moscow mule,” says Catherine Flugel ’20. Ronzios catered the event with a variety of party pizzas. Flugel “could not get enough of the pizza.” She said “The buffalo chicken was amazing—I had six slices!”  

Congress kept the event strictly for seniors, and they even hired a member of the senior class to DJ the event. Jack Brighenti ’20 has been a DJ for over three years, and he was thrilled to be able to play music to make 220 Night all the more fun for seniors. Brighenti said, “I was able to play a wide variety of genres and it flowed very well as the vibe changed throughout the night. I had amazing crowd reactions, but the real game changer was when I was asked to play ‘Drop it Low’ by Ester Dean.”

The dance was a great way to get all of the seniors together back on campus. Kirk Esmero ’20 said “Often, many seniors stay off campus on the weekends and I missed having everyone in the Slavin Center together.” Overall, Esmero felt that the night was “hashtag, electric!”

Many students decided to go to McPhail’s during and after the event to play ping pong, have popcorn, and just spend time with each other. Brandon Sahler ’20 says, “Spending time at McPhail’s was the perfect way to end the night. I loved getting together with friends to recap the night and make memories that will carry through until graduation.”

Vice President of Student Congress, Sean Richardson ’20, says that 220 Night was a “perfect beginning to senior year.” Richardson and the rest of Student Congress cannot wait to plan more exciting events for the senior class this year.

Zac Brown Band Continues to be Prolific

by The Cowl Editor


Arts & Entertainment


Defies Country Genre with New Album, The Owl

by Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

Zac Brown Yelling The Owl
PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

This past Friday, September 20 Zac Brown Band dropped their sixth studio album, The Owl, and have received mixed feedback. 

In the past decade, Zac Brown Band has been one of the most popular and successful country music groups. With hits like “Chicken Fried,” “Knee Deep,” and “Homegrown,” the group seems to be on everyone’s radar, whether they like country music or not. In the past year, the band has hired a new manager, Scooter Braun, the well-known manager of Justin Bieber. With Braun managing this country band alongside numerous other famous pop artists, many anticipated a pop vibe on Zac Brown Band’s new album. The three-time Grammy Award-winning band decided to explore new sounds in The Owl, featuring unexpected collaborations. According to Rolling Stone, this “marks Zac Brown Band’s most personal and genre-defying album to date.” The album name is inspired by the lore surrounding the great horned owl. This owl can see perfectly at night, making it a symbol of a reliable guide, even during the darkest times. 

The 11-song set consists of some powerhouse collaborations. Number six on the track list, titled “Finish What We Started,” features Brandi Carlile. Other titles include “Already on Fire,” “The Woods,” “Warrior,” and “OMW.”

Zac Brown Band The Owl Album Cover
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPOTIFY

“Need This” was co-produced by Ryan Tedder of OneRepublic, songwriter and producer Jason “Poo Bear” Boyd, and country songwriter Andrew DeRoberts.  This song is a chill, laid back tune about Zac Brown on a beach getaway, much like the band’s signature hit “Toes.” 

An anticipated hit song on the album is “God Given,” which has already been featured in ZBB’s live show Leaving Love Behind. The lead single “Someone I Used to Know” was released in November 2018, almost an entire year ago. That song made it to number 34 on the Top Country charts.

Some critics, such as Rolling Stone and The Daily Campus, are loving the new album. However, a lot of country music lovers have been shaking their heads since the release. Popular Youtube country music critic Grady Smith said he had two words in response to the album, “What happened?” He says the band has been known for “their harmony, their incredible instrumentation, yet also their welcoming, fun, warm, excellent musicality that has almost a Grateful Dead-like following.” He says that they have tried to explore pop-sounds before in their Jekyll + Hyde album, but went back to their original country sound with Welcome Home. 

However, in this album, Smith said ZBB has gone “full tilt crazy.” Other critics on websites such as Saving Country Music fear that one of the best country music bands has taken a turn for the worst, echoing artists like Taylor Swift who have fallen from the favor of country music critics after a shift in genre.

From these reviews, we can see that Zac Brown Band is at a crossroads. Either they can continue exploring new sounds and genres, or go back to their roots which have given them incredible success over the years.  

Last Chance Mass Showcases Student Singers

by The Cowl Editor


On-Campus


Get to Know the 10 p.m. Mass Choir

by Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR

One of the most well-known traditions at Providence College is the “Last Chance Mass,” celebrated every Sunday at 10 p.m. in St. Dominics Chapel. It is the final Mass of the weekend and the most well-attended. 

There is an indescribable feeling of peace at the Last Chance Mass, which for students marks the end of one busy week and a pause before the next. The lights are dimmed low, candles are lit, and the St. Dominic Ensemble plays folk music. 

St. Dominic Ensemble performs at every 10 p.m. Mass, specializing in contemporary Christian music. This year’s choir is led by Fiona Pearlman ’20 and consists of nine other singers and musicians: John Duffy ’20, Brooke Douglass ’21, Abby Kojoian ’21, Kevin Lydon ’21, Nolan Donato ’22, Catalina Mazo ’22, Grace Dizon ’23, Joe Genest ’22, and Steph Rizzo ’20. 

Pearlman always knew that music was an important part of her life. She said her mother and Nana always told her that “singing is praying twice.” She never understood what that meant until she sang along with the music at Mass. Pearlman said, “music taught me what prayer is, who God is, how He loves me, and how He has been present in my life all along.” When she was a sophomore, she decided to audition for the Ensemble, even though she did not feel like she was religious enough to be a part of such a faithful group. Yet, she ended up making it. Now, Pearlman not only gets to express her love for music every Sunday, but she gets to praise and worship God, with whom she has become closer because of the choir. Her favorite part of singing at the Mass is “being able to spread God’s love to others through the beauty of music.” 

The College community is extremely grateful to have singers and musicians like this group to keep the tradition of the Last Chance Mass alive. Some of this year’s group’s favorite songs to sing are “Lord I Need You,” “Heart of Worship,” and “Out of Hiding.” Sarah Kerrigan ’20 says she loves going to the Mass because she “really feels the Friar family come together.” 

This tradition has been bringing students closer to God for generations. Alumni and parents will get the chance to experience the music of the 10 p.m. Mass during Homecoming Weekend on Sunday, October 6 at 9 a.m. with folk music by Bob Pfunder ’09 and Liz Cotrupi Pfunder ’08. The Mass will be celebrated by Rev. James Cuddy, O.P. ’98 with members of the Dominican community.

Hunter Hayes Releases Surprise Album Wild Blue

by The Cowl Editor


Arts & Entertainment


Country Artist Collaborates with Pop Star Andy Grammer

by Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

Four years after his last album, country-pop singer Hunter Hayes has released a surprise album, Wild Blue (Part 1). In an interview with Billboard, Hayes said, “I gave myself the right to make a record I didn’t think anybody would ever listen to.” The singer felt a sense of freedom in being able to produce music without the pressure to meet anyone’s expectations. He rented the Warner Music Nashville studio without telling anybody and took the opportunity as a “writing retreat” where he could create music during a particular time of heartbreak and turbulence.  

Hunter Hayes Wild Blue (Part 1) album cover
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPOTIFY

Hayes felt the need to hit the reset button on his life in early 2018. The singer had a painful breakup with his long-time girlfriend, parted ways with a trusted business associate, questioned his friendships, and missed his hometown. In the midst of his existential crisis, Hayes found solace in a piece of art by Scott Hill he had stumbled upon. Hayes collected many paintings by Hill which depict lonesome figures in stunning landscapes. This is what inspired the title of his album and the emotional song “Wild Blue.”  

The ten-song collection was completed at the end of June and features his current single “Heartbreak,” and other songs including “Madness,” “One Shot,” “One Good Reason,” “My Song Too,” and “Loving You.” Hayes wrote the last song on the album, “Still,” back in December of 2018, perhaps exposing his soul-searching story. It is about the struggle he has gone through in the past decade, discovering who he is, who people think he is, and who he wants to be.

Hayes collaborated with pop singer Andy Grammer and songwriter Dave Spencer to write the song “Dear God.” He was inspired by Andy Grammer, who raised the question to God, “Are you sure that you don’t mess up?” Hayes said when he heard Grammer pen the question out loud, he froze because that doubt has always been one of his biggest fears. 

Overall, the singer hopes that his fans and country music lovers will realize that Wild Blue is the most honest album he has ever made. It exposes him in the most vulnerable state of his life, and he hopes that others will find hope and meaning in the passionate intensity behind his creation. He has been painfully honest with the world, and hopes that it will resonate with those going through similar experiences. 

 

‘Unplanned’ Parenthood

by The Cowl Editor


Film and Television


Pro-Life and Pro-Choice Perspectives Revealed

by Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

Unfazed by a Twitter ban, “R” rating, and a restriction to be shown in select theaters throughout the U.S., the new pro-life film Unplanned,is currently among one of the top 10 films in the box-office. The film stirred controversy among Hollywood producers and pro-choice activists. Nearly a dozen major music labels denied producers’ requests to license music for the film. Other than Fox and the Christian Broadcasting Network, major TV networks have refused to run ads promoting it. Nonetheless, the film earned $3.2 million during its second weekend in theaters.

Unplanned tells the true story of Abby Johnson (portrayed by Ashley Bratcher), a former Planned Parenthood director and “employee of the year,” following her life journey from pro-choice to pro-life activism. 

Over the course of eight years, Johnson rose in the ranks of Planned Parenthood, eventually becoming one of the youngest clinic directors in history. Her parents and husband were completely against her working for a company that supports abortion; however, Abby believed what she was doing was right and that it was helping women. But everything changed for her when she assisted in an ultrasound-guided abortion.

In the initial 15 minutes of the film, Abby narrates what she experienced while witnessing the abortion of a 13-week fetus. Instructed by the doctor to probe an ultrasound, Abby sees a baby on the sonogram. To Abby, the baby on the sonogram appeared to be “twisting” and “fighting for its life.” Abby ran out of the procedure room in tears and ultimately changed her position on abortion entirely. To Abby, it was “this perfect little baby,” and then “it was just gone.” Abby no longer saw abortion as a woman’s right, but rather, as killing a child. 

PHOTO COURTESY OF UNPLANNED.COM

The movie flashes back to other incidents which participated in her conversion, including two of her own abortions. One of her abortions was through the use of the abortion pill which a worker at Planned Parenthood told her would easily end her pregnancy with some “light bleeding.” However, she ends up feeling on the brink of death, left alone in excruciating pain for 12 hours. In another scene, a high-school girl is brought into the clinic by her father. She experiences severe complications and bleeding, yet the head of the clinic refuses to call 911, as it may cause bad publicity for Planned Parenthood. 

Unplanned does not shy away from portraying Johnson’s view of abortion. A pro-choice review by Bridgett Bayley revealed that this narrative “moved her to tears” and she “appreciated the way the workers of Planned Parenthood were portrayed. . . like they really did believe what they were doing was morally right.” The National Review says, “None of it is easy to watch, but none of it is a lie.” 

In an interview with Fox News Insider, Bratcher describes what it was like to play the role of Abby and the message she wants America to hear. She says, “This movie is not about judgement. We are not seeking to attack Planned Parenthood, but to open the eyes of the public to reveal what abortion really is.”

Exploring Taverns Near Shakespearian Theaters: The Humanities Forum Hosts Br. Jordan Zajac ’04, O.P.

by The Cowl Editor


On-Campus


Virtue’s Pour: Taverns In and Around the Shakespearean Theater

by Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

Brother Jordan Zajac ’04, O.P., Providence College alumnus and now Friar, gave a talk at the Humanities Forum on the role of virtue in taverns in Shakespearean plays on Friday, March 29 in the Ruane Center for the Humanities. Brother Jordan grew up in New Bedford before attending PC to major in English and minor in political science.  From there, he went to the University of Virgina to receive a master’s degree, finally attending the University of Massachusetts Amherst to get his Ph.D. in Shakespearean Drama. He joined the Order of Preachers at the Dominican House of Studies in 2013.

Brother Jordan centered his talk on Shakespearean times—16th century London, United Kingdom. Plays were popular culture during this time, and social groups formed revolving around them. All types of people were welcomed to these plays, whether groundlings (commoners who sat at the lower level among those in their class), or the wealthy (who sat in expensive seats in boxes above). 

During this time, drinking was commonplace in London. For this reason, Shakespearean plays often took place in the alehouse. Brother Jordan quoted a German writer who came to London and said he had “never seen more taverns and alehouses than in London.” He went on to say, “Where there are theaters, there are taverns.” 

From this, Brother Jordan gathered that Shakespeare, having read Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, intentionally used alehouses and taverns as main settings in his plays to promote the virtue of temperance. Staging scenes in alehouses was a completely new idea, and Shakespeare took precisely these circumstances as a model, not to follow upon the drunkenness which took place in the taverns, but rather to present men in the ugliness of their vices in order to make others abhor them and make them hate the sins themselves.

CAMERON VILLARUEL ’21/THE COWL

One of the examples given by Brother Jordan was the figure of Falstaff in Henry IV. He describes Falstaff as an “appetite with legs”—someone who is bold, eats too much, and drinks too much. Falstaff is one of Shakespeare’s most memorable characters. One of his companions in Henry IV is the Prince who is a virtuous foil to Falstaff’s vices. Unlike Falstaff, the Prince is able to resist bodily pleasures. He does not fall into temptation, but rather, he is aware of it. The Prince recognizes that not everything revolves around sensual pleasure and is able to pursue human desires temperately. 

Brother Jordan concluded by tying this into Aristotle’s philosophical description of happiness, opposing what most people think happiness entails, which is sensual pleasure; this conception of happiness makes people slaves to their desires. Rather, Brother Jordan describes the happy person as one who pursues sense pleasures rationally. He says, “to be drunk is to hinder what makes us unique in our rationality. It makes us less.”

As an alumnus, Brother Jordan is aware of the drinking culture at PC. Jokingly, he concluded by comparing students to Falstaff and reminded us to try and live temperately in our popular drinking culture. 

FRIARCON 2019

by The Cowl Editor


On-Campus


Alumni & Family Weekend

by Catherine Goldberg ’20 A&E Staff

PHOTO COURTESY OF NORA JOHNSON ’20/THE COWL

This year’s Alumni & Family Weekend, which took place on Feb. 22-24, had many special events planned to celebrate the Friar Family and demonstrate Providence College pride. On Saturday, from 2:30-5 p.m., the Alumni & Family Weekend Committee put together FRIARCON, an event jam-packed with food, fun, and live entertainment. 

There was a variety of different booths spanning the Peterson Recreation Center, highlighting the different clubs and organizations at the College. Members of The Cowl, Board of Programmers (BOP), Friars Club, Student Alumni Association, WDOM Radio, and more sat at each booth, greeting students and alumni to explain what their clubs are all about.

The Committee decked Peterson out with lights, different types of food, including Polish pierogis, pizza, and hot dogs, a beer garden for those who were 21+, and athletes leading different sporting activities for the younger kids. A rounded stage sat at the center of Peterson, eager to greet the performers who were coming later on in the day. 

There were different student performers on the Peterson stage, including the Believers of Words (PC’s poetry club), the Dance Club, STEP, Motherland Dance Group, and PC Irish Dance. Elizabeth Connor ’20, Maddie Reilly ’20, and Sarah Kerrigan ’20 of PC Irish Dance said that they “loved performing for alumni and the PC community by expressing  [their] love of Irish culture.” Likewise, the other performers were eager to share with alumni, whether through dance or poetry, what they are passionate about at PC. 

The second annual FRIARCON with its Friar Family of all ages showed that the community spirit never fades at PC.