Kicking for a Cause: Friars For ____ Hosts Charity Kickball Event

by The Cowl Editor


Campus


Various clubs supported the fundraising efforts. Brianna Colletti ’21/THECOWL

by Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

On Sunday, November 17, many clubs on campus came together for some friendly competition at Glay Field. Providence College’s “Big Five” — Board of Programmers (BOP), Board of Multicultural Student Affairs (BMSA), Friars Club, Student Congress, and Campus Ministry—played in a kickball tournament to raise money for those affected by Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas.

The afternoon was full of music, food, and some friendly competition. In the end, Friars Club was the big winner of the kickball tournament, beating Student Congress with a score of six to five in an exciting final game.

Students who could not make the event were still able to be involved by purchasing raffle tickets. The six prize packages included LaSalle gift cards, restaurant vouchers, and “Friars for Bahamas” t-shirts.

The event was sponsored by both the Organization of Latin American Students (OLAS) and the Friars For ___ club. Friars For ___ raises money and awareness for a variety of causes and encourages students to “fill in the blank” with causes that they want to support. The club is only in its second year at PC, but has already had great success. In the past, they have sponsored events for causes like Operation Christmas Child, Puerto Rico, and PAWS.

Sunday’s event raised funds for the Bahamas in response to Hurricane Dorian. In August of 2019, the islands of the Bahamas were devastated by the category-five storm. The money raised from the event will be going to Samaritan’s Purse, a worldwide charitable organization.

Friars For ___ executive member Adriana Santos ’21 called the event “a huge success.” The event raised over $750, which the club is excited to give directly to those in need in the Bahamas. “It will all go to [Samaritan’s Purse],” said Santos. “They have a mobile site right in the Bahamas and are providing aid to those affected.” The charity has been providing much-needed services to the devastated areas. The charity explains on their website that the mobile facility “is now operating out of Emergency Field Hospital in Freeport on Grand Bahama, performing lifesaving surgeries and otherwise treating patients for a variety of injuries and illnesses.” They have served thousands of patients in the two months since opening.

The Friar community came together to help those in need in the Bahamas, and Friars For ____will surely look to support other communities in the future. Contact the Friars For ____ club with any suggestions of causes you would like to support.

Bursting the PC Bubble: Student Strike Calls Attention to Climate Change

by The Cowl Editor


National and Global News


Friday saw large numbers of people come together against climate change.

by Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

On Sep. 20, millions of young people around the world went outside instead of going into their classrooms. These students did not skip school for a laidback day of relaxation, though. Rather, they chose to take part in one of the largest marches in history: the Global Climate Strike.

An estimated four million people participated in the strike, and marches were held in over 150 countries across all seven continents—including Antarctica. 

Protests were also held locally in Providence. Over 1,000 people organized a strike and protested throughout the capitol city.

The cause was championed by sixteen-year-old Greta Thunberg, who began protesting last year in her native Stockholm. She sat outside the Swedish Parliament Building with a sign reading “school strike for the climate,” skipping school every Friday until the government took action against climate change. 

Her social media posts documenting the protest began receiving attention, and the movement—which became known as “Fridays for Future”—gained support. The growth is clearly visible on social media. Thunberg was alone in her first strike in Sep. 2018; however, on Sept. 21, she was surrounded by hundreds of thousands of people in New York City.

Thunberg has become the face of a movement largely led by the younger generations. She represents the frustration many feel at those in power who are not concerend, many of whom may not live to see the consequences of their inaction. Relating back to the school strike, Thunberg asks, “Why should we study for a future that is being taken away from us?”

The general sentiment from the day was that the movement’s growth was a positive step forward, but there are still many to be taken on this journey. 

Thunberg spoke of this at a previous protest, saying, “Even though this movement has become huge and there have been millions of children and young people who have been on strike from school for the climate, the emission curve is still not reducing… and of course that is all that matters.” 

This sense of urgency was evident during Friday’s strike. Many protesters believe humanity is facing a life-or-death situation and everyone needs to realize the gravity of the issue at hand.

Protestors will not stop until a safe future is guaranteed, and as Thunberg told the crowd, “We will do everything in our power to stop this crisis from getting worse, even if it means skipping school or work, because this is more important.” If the crowd’s reaction when Thunberg asked if a safe future is “really too much to ask” is any indication, then the call for change will not be silenced any time soon.

Oh, The Places You’ll Go: PC Students Take Learning Outside the Classroom During Maymesters

by The Cowl Editor


Campus


Students and professors outside the Brandenburg Gate in Germany.

by Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

Many students spend time traveling during the summer vacation; others continue their studies and take courses during the break. Maymesters provide students the opportunity to do both of these things — all within the first few weeks of summer. 

This year, Providence College offered two programs — one in Europe, and one in Africa.

A Maymester is generally a six-week course: five full days of class on campus, 10-14 days travelling abroad, and a few weeks upon return to work on an independent research project. 

The programs can be a bit of a whirlwind due to the condensed time frame, but it is a fair trade considering the material is equivalent to that covered in a 14-week semester. Maymesters can also be great options for students who do not want to spend a full semester studying abroad or are unable to do so, with past participants calling them “incredible,” “fascinating,” and “a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

Since the program’s introduction in, courses have covered a variety of topics and reached many destinations, ranging from the Road to Santiago de Compostela in Spain and Portugal to the relationship between the U.S. and Japan. Each course is taught by a group of professors across different disciplines, allowing students to explore a topic from many angles and develop a more complete perspective. 

For example, Margaret Manchester, professor of history, Eric Bennett, professor of English, and Eric Sung, professor of art and art history, led this year’s trip entitled U.S. and the Cold War in Eastern Europe.

The group traveled to Germany, Poland, and Hungary, visiting sites like the Berlin Wall, the Gdansk Solidarity Shipyards, the Warsaw Palace of Culture and Science, and the thermal baths in Budapest. 

While the main focus of the course was history, students could also fulfill the fine arts requirement. Students learned about photography both on campus and abroad, and most completed a digital storytelling project upon returning from the trip.

Another Maymester group traveled to Ghana as part of the course Sustainability and Social Values: Systems Approach to Complex Problem Solving. The program started when the late Dr. Stephen J. Mecc, Ph.D. ’64 & ’66G took research students to Ghana in 2010. 

The trip became a yearly event under Dr. Mecca, as students problem-solved and applied their solutions to real world issues. One year, for instance, they developed a flushing-valve toilet that required less than a cup of water. Students across majors were involved in the project. Some engineered the toilet, others translated the instruction manual, and others worked in educating the community. 

Since Dr. Mecca’s passing in 2018, his legacy has continued to live on in the Ghanaian community. A book drive was held on campus during the spring, and donations were brought to schoolchildren in Ghana.

This year, professor Comfort M. Ateh accompanied the program and documented the group’s experience in real-time on Twitter. 

Six of the students were recipients of the Gallo Global Health Fellowship, a fund established by Robert C. Gallo, M.D. ’59 & ’74Hon. and his wife, Mary Jane Gallo, for annual service-oriented summer internships for students from multiple academic disciplines in clinical settings in the United States and abroad. Dr. Gallo is globally renowned for his breakthrough discoveries in HIV research, something the Fellows saw firsthand when they participated in HIV testing and counseling program.

The Maymester course offerings for 2020 will see programs in Cuba, England, Italy, and South Korea.

Bursting the PC Bubble: Trump Visits South Korea for Summit with Kim Jong-Un

by The Cowl Editor


National and Global News


President Trump and Chairman Kim conduct “very friendly” negotiations.

Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

On Feb. 27, United States President Donald Trump and Chairman Kim Jong-un of the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea met for a summit in Hanoi, Vietnam. This was the second meeting between the two leaders following the historic Singapore Summit in June 2018. 

The first meeting marked a new relationship between the countries as Trump and Kim agreed to work towards peaceful relations, including denuclearization and security protections. However, the recent Hanoi Summit did not end on such positive terms.

The summit abruptly ended on Feb. 28, after both sides failed to reach an agreement on denuclearization. Trump cited sanctions as the issue of contention; however, North Korea’s Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho claimed his country was willing to compromise on the issue. 

Despite the contradicting reports, Trump insists that there is no hostility between himself and Kim, calling the departure “very friendly.” Trump further believes the summit was a productive step forward for United States-North Korea relations, tweeting on March 1, “We had very substantive negotiations with Kim Jong-Un—we know what they want and they know what we must have.”

Although no policy changes were made, the meeting still made headlines. One of the most noteworthy moments was Trump’s comments about Otto Warmbier—the college student who died in 2017 after being held in North Korean custody for attempted theft.

Trump, who was instrumental in Warmbier’s return to the United States, seemed to divert from his originally harsh stance on the North Korean authorities. He said on Feb. 27, “I believe something very bad happened to him. I don’t think leadership knew about it.” 

The comment was met with criticism from both Republicans and Democrats, many of whom blame Kim for his involvement in the 22-year-old’s death. 

Warmbier’s family also expressed frustration with the President’s moderate tone and reiterated that they hold the regime responsible. 

Upon his return to the U.S., Trump attempted to clarify his comment within the context of the summit. He called it a “very delicate balance,” adding that “in one way I have to negotiate and the way I love Mr. and Mrs. Warmbier and I love Otto.” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who accompanied the President to the summit, also clarified to the press that “the North Korean regime is responsible.”

There are currently no plans in place for a future meeting, but neither country has ruled out the potential for another summit. Summing up his stance and future possibilities, President Trump tweeted, “relationship [with Kim Jong Un] very good, let’s see what happens!”

Extra! Extra! Read All About It!: Phillips Memorial Library Partners with National Newspapers

by The Cowl Editor


Campus


The newspaper remains a reliable source of information.

by Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

Newspapers offer unique perspectives and historical contexts that can only be found in periodicals, and now millions of pages of them are readily available online. At Providence College, this ability has recently been made even easier due to the library’s recent partnerships.

Phillips Memorial Library recently purchased campus-wide licenses to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal websites. Both newspapers have been in publication since the mid-19th century and are currently the 2nd and 3rd largest in U.S. circulation, respectively.

There was a time when reading the newspaper was the only way for people to keep up with current events. Morning and evening papers would be delivered to the front door twice a day, keepng the public informed about breaking news in their communities and from around the world. 

While this was the norm only a few decades ago, it now seems archaic to younger generations, college students in particular.

As the world becomes more digitized, it may seem like there is a lesser need for newspapers. This may be true in the physical sense — people are now more likely to scroll through articles on the Internet than actually flip through the paper. 

But even in the  world of Twitter feeds and Facebook updates, a newspaper can still be one of the most reliable sources of information.

Recognizing this modern dilemma, and in an effort to evolve in the digital world, almost all newspapers are now accessible online. This is not only true of issues that are currently being published, but many sites include past publications with articles spanning throughout history. 

Content from these publications is already available to the PC community via the library’s databases, however, the new partnership will allow direct access to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal websites. 

There are many benefits of this added feature.  Assistant Library Director Sarah Edmonds explained, “Access to their websites allows for browsing and a more immediate, dynamic experience.” 

These are great academic resources, and many students utilize the already existing databases for research purposes. However, the new partnership has a wide range of benefits beyond academics, and the library hopes the community will take the opportunity to explore them. 

“We know that they are great tools for teaching, as well as professional and personal growth and civic engagement,” said Edmonds. “We hope that many members of the PC community will take advantage of these partnerships.”

These services will be available free of charge to everyone in the PC community—students, staff, and faculty. 

To sign up, contact Edmonds, or stop by Phillips Memorial Library to get more information.

Bursting the PC Bubble: A Temporary End to the Government Shutdown: Will it Last?

by The Cowl Editor


National and Global News


by Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

For the 35 days the government was shutdown, there seemed to be no end in sight. However, in a surprising turn of events, it was announced on Jan. 25 that the government would be reopening—sort of. 

Last Friday, President Trump signed a bill that would temporarily reopen the federal government for three weeks, beginning on Jan. 28.

The recent government shutdown, which has been the longest in U.S. history, began on Dec. 22, after Congress failed to approve a budget including funds for the proposed border wall. The wall has long been a priority for President Trump. 

Ever since announcing his election campaign in 2015, he has been adamant about building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border to prevent people from illegally entering the country. The wall is part of Trump’s solution to strengthen national border security. 

The need for immigration reform is an issue acknowledged by both parties, but for as long as Trump has been emphasizing a wall, many Democrats have avidly opposed it. 

In addition to pointing out flaws in the actual construction and funding, many of them oppose the wall for what it represents. They argue that a physical barrier closing off entrance to the U.S. goes against the ideals of America, a sentiment House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has echoed frequently, calling it “immoral.”

The temporary reopening comes on the heels of rising frustration among the American people. One of the biggest criticisms of the shutdown was that the 800,000 federal workers were not receiving their paychecks, including some employees working in essential agencies who still had to report to work. 

Although people will be compensated when the government opens again, it still put a financial strain on employees who live paycheck to paycheck. 

Both sides cited this as their motive to agree to the temporary reopening: on Twitter, Speaker Pelosi wrote that it was “for America’s families & small businesses, as well as ensure federal workers finally receive the pay they deserve;” President Trump tweeted that “it was taking care of millions of people who were getting badly hurt by the Shutdown.”

Although the shutdown was initially due to disagreement over the national border security budget, the actual policy does not seem to be the issue anymore. 

It has turned into a standoff between the President and Congress, ultimately symbolizing a test of powers, and reluctance to concede. Both sides have stood firm in their positions. 

Trump has repeatedly noted that he will not take less than a $5.7 billion budget for the wall; likewise, Congress has refused the President’s proposed compromise, which included temporary protection for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients. These uncompromising stances will make negotiations difficult, because, as Trump commented on Twitter, “both parties [are] very dug in.”

While the government is currently reopened, this is by no means a permanent solution. 

The temporary nature of the agreement means that the government will have three weeks to resolve the budget. If no solution is reached, the President could declare a national emergency or the government could shut down again. 

President Trump has expressed his willingness to take either of these routes. The countdown is on until Feb. 15, and we will have to wait and see if a resolution can be reached before time is up.

Students Get an Inside Look at the Entertainment Industry

by The Cowl Editor


Campus


By Kelly Marcela ’21

While Rhode Island rang in the new year with cold winter weather, some students escaped to sunny California this January.

As part of the Providence College in Hollywood program, 13 PC students and four faculty members from various departments traveled to Los Angeles, to spend three days exploring the entertainment industry and potential career paths.

The PC in Hollywood program was founded in 2012 by alum Todd Slater ’97 – an independent film producer and partner at Blue Fox Entertainment – with the goal of introducing students to potential career paths in the entertainment industry.

Since its foundation, the program has already seen success: four former PC in Hollywood participants are currently working in the Los Angeles entertainment industry, and many others have spent a summer interning with alumni in Hollywood.

The itinerary was an action-packed three days, as students were introduced to all aspects of the industry, from acting and directing to writing and creative advertising. They learned about a variety of fields within entertainment, and participant William Burleigh ’19 said, “I definitely learned a lot about what the film industry is like.”

A highlight was visiting the sets of major Hollywood studios including Sony Picture Studios, Sunset Gower Studios, and touring the set of Criminal Minds.

The trip was an incredible opportunity, not just to visit the entertainment industry in Los Angeles, but also to network there. They met with alumni from places like Focus Features, the Walt Disney Company, and the Hollywood Museum.

The trip also included a networking night with local alumni in Los Angeles. Seeing the success of fellow Friars was an inspiration for students like Ariel Tavares ’20, who said, “It’s almost surreal to know they shared the same rooms in Ruane and Smith that we use now to make their dream a reality.”

PC has no shortage of alumni who have made their name in the entertainment industry, both onscreen and off.

One big name is John O’Hurley, ’76, who is known for his recurring role on Seinfeld among other things. Another success is John Bowab, ’55, who spent over 30 years directing on Broadway and television.

Students had the chance to meet both O’Hurley and Bowab on the trip. The connections with all of the alumni went beyond professional advice and became personal mentors.

This was particularly meaningful for Tavares, who added, “I guess I didn’t realize just how true the statement was that ‘Friars give back’. So many successful alumni took the time out of their busy schedules to not only share their stories but offer themselves up as a resource.”

Alumni also show support through their donations, which make the annual program possible.

PC in Hollywood was a preview of life after graduation for students interested in a career in the entertainment industry.

Most of the participants are film minors and theater majors, like Aisling Sheahan, ’19, who plans to apply the knowledge from her experience to her theater major and beyond.

She explained, “I was able to connect with many PC alumni out in Hollywood and create relationships with them,” She also shared that the the alumni happily shared their wisdom and that she was “able to ask for their advice.”

In addition to forming professional relationships in the industry, students were also able to make personal connections with fellow students who share their passion. The prospect of building a career in Hollywood can be daunting, but a support system on campus can boost up confidence.

Erica Beatey ’19 expressed her gratitude for the opportunity to form such friendships through the program, “I was also blessed to meet my fellow students who are now my friends. PC in Hollywood gave us the gift of each other to confide in, work beside, and strive towards greatness with.”

The trip also included a networking night with local alumni in Los Angeles. Seeing the success of fellow Friars was an inspiration for students like Ariel Tavares ’20, who said, “It’s almost surreal to know they shared the same rooms in Ruane and Smith that we use now to make their dream a reality.” 

PC has no shortage of alumni who have made their name in the entertainment industry, both onscreen and off. 

One big name is John O’Hurley ’76 who is known for his recurring role on Seinfeld, among other things. Another success is John Bowab ’55 who spent over 30 years directing on Broadway and on television. 

Students had the chance to meet both O’Hurley and Bowab on the trip. The connections with all of the alumni went beyond professional advice and became personal mentors. 

This was particularly meaningful for Tavares, who added, “I guess I didn’t realize just how true the statement was that ‘Friars give back.’ So many successful alumni took the time out of their busy schedules to not only share their stories but offer themselves up as a resource.” 

Alumni also show support through their donations, which make the annual program possible.

PC in Hollywood was a preview of life after graduation for students interested in a career in the entertainment industry. 

Most of the participants are film minors and theater majors, like Aisling Sheahan ’19, who plans to apply the knowledge from her experience to her theater major and beyond. 

She explained, “I was able to connect with many PC alumni out in Hollywood and create relationships with them.” She also shared that the the alumni happily shared their wisdom and that she was “able to ask for their advice.” 

In addition to forming professional relationships in the industry, students were also able to make personal connections with fellow students who share their passion. The prospect of building a career in Hollywood can be daunting, but a support system on campus can boost up confidence. 

Erica Beatey ’19 expressed her gratitude for the opportunity to form such friendships through the program, “I was also blessed to meet my fellow students who are now my friends. PC in Hollywood gave us the gift of each other to confide in, work beside, and strive towards greatness with.”

Bursting the PC Bubble: Looking Back on the Year’s Biggest Events

by The Cowl Editor


National and Global News


Remembering some of the movies, natural disasters, political events and more from this year.

by Kelly Marcela ’21

News Staff

As the calendars turn to December, people reflect on the past 12 months, and it seems like every year people say it has been “the most eventful year” in history. This may be a bold claim, but 2018 definitely had enough events to fill the news.

Politics always seem to dominate the news, and this year was no exception. With a Republican-controlled Congress, many of President Donald Trump’s policies were implemented in 2018, including major reforms to taxes and health care. 

Foreign policy was also a main focus, as President Trump met with two of the world’s most controversial leaders: Vladimir Putin at the Russia-United States summit and Kim Jong-Un at the historic North Korea-United States summit. 

Immigration was another main topic in politics this year. In November, a migrant caravan from Central America reached the U.S. border, resulting in a clash between migrants and border officials armed with tear gas. 

This news came shortly after another border issue, as illegal immigrants were separated from their families and hundreds of their children were housed in government custody.

Overall, the political climate in the U.S. remained polarized, as it has in recent years. This culminated in the November 2018 midterm elections, when the polls saw a record number of voters. 

Ultimately, Democrats took over control of the House of Representatives, but Republicans kept the majority in the Senate.

In 2017, Time Magazine named “the silence breakers,” those who spoke out against sexual assault and began the #MeToo movement, its Person of the Year. 

The #MeToo movement continued in 2018 and spread far beyond Hollywood, as women and men of all backgrounds came forth and shared their stories. 

It even reached the highest level of government when allegations came out against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. He was accused of sexual assault by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford during their high school years, and she testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee in September. 

Kavanaugh was confirmed and sworn in on Oct. 6 after an FBI investigation; however, the proceedings brought attention to sexual assault survivors, and Ford received public support.

Meanwhile, news surrounding the British Royal Family frequently made international headlines. 

On April 23, Prince William and Duchess Kate Middleton had their third child, Prince Louis. 

Millions around the world watched the Royal Wedding on May 19, when Prince Harry married Meghan Markle. The couple announced a few months later that they will be expecting a baby in 2019.

Sports occupied the news as well, starting with the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea. 

Norway took home the most medals with 39 in total, but the United States had a fair showing, earning 23, nine of them gold, including team wins in women’s hockey and men’s curling. 

Over the summer, the 2018 FIFA World Cup took place in Russia, with France beating Croatia in the final 4-2. 

It was also an exciting year for American sports: the Philadelphia Eagles and the Washington Capitals took home their first championships in franchise history. The Golden State Warriors and the Boston Red Sox also added to their dynasties, with a sixth and ninth championship, respectively.

2018 was also a big year for pop culture. At the movies, superheroes seemed to be fan favorites, with Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War, and Incredibles 2 as the top three grossing films. 

Movie musicals were also a trend, with films like The Greatest Showman, Mamma Mia 2: Here We Go Again, A Star is Born, and Bohemian Rhapsody finding success at the box office, as well as their soundtracks on the album charts. 

It was a notable year in music as well, and Drake’s album Scorpion was the hit of the year. Starting with Ed Sheeran to most recently Ariana Grande, a wide variety of artists and genres had songs on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2018.

Unfortunately, a year in review would not be complete without remembering the tragedies as well. 

Wildfires devastated California, leaving dozens dead throughout the state, and thousands more homeless or with lost possessions. 

There were senseless acts of violence and hatred all across the country, from the bar shooting in Thousand Oaks, California to the shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

However, tragedies can also unite people and empower them to make a difference. This was exemplified by students in Parkland, Florida, after 17 were killed at their high school, Marjory Stoneman Douglas. They became gun control activists and started a movement led by young people, eventually organizing the March for Our Lives in March 2018.

2018 has been an eventful year to say the least, and this is just a sampling of it. Whether it was good or bad, memorable or forgettable, we made it through another year…so here’s to 2019.

Study Catholicism in Rome: PC Offers New Study Abroad Opportunity for All Majors

by The Cowl Editor


Campus


by Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

Studying abroad is a highlight of the college experience for many, and Providence College has no shortage of global opportunities. Next spring, PC students will have a new option to choose from: studying Catholic theology and culture in Rome.

PC students study abroad through the Center for Global Education (CGE). The CGE offers programs in over 40 countries, allowing students to travel anywhere from South Africa to South Korea.

As listed on their website, the Center has four pedagogical goals:  curricular integration, geographic diversity of program locations, program diversity, and career integration and development. While students may be thousands of miles away from campus, study abroad is an extension of the education at PC. The CGE states that “study abroad provides alternative learning environments so students can benefit from new academic perspectives and intercultural experiences.” 

Italy is not a new destination for PC students looking to study abroad. Since 2013, a popular program has been “PC in Rome,” where students live and study in the Italian capital for a semester. 

Rome has long been a popular destination for visitors, attracting people from all over the world to experience Roman culture. 

One of the city’s main attractions is its history. The center of the ancient world, Rome has thousands of years of rich history, and sites such as the Roman Forum and the Colosseum are still preserved and available to explore. Vatican City to this day is the center of the Catholic Church, and home to the Pope.

It is also known for its art, not only in Vatican City but throughout the city of Rome itself. Rome also has some of the world’s most beautiful architecture, easily spotted throughout the entire city.  

PC’s program will expose students to all of the historical, theological, and artistic culture that Rome has to offer. Among other exciting opportunities, one of the highlights will be experiencing Holy Week and Easter at the Vatican. Faith is at the core of PC, and this program allows students to see it in a new perspective. They will be able to apply the values and experience firsthand the theological ideas taught on campus. 

The new program will be starting in the spring semester of 2020. It will be run by the theology department, and students will have the opportunity to earn credits toward a theology minor. More information will be coming soon. 

 

Study Catholicism in Rome: PC Offers New Study Abroad Opportunity for All Majors

by The Cowl Editor


Campus


by Kelly Martella ’21

News Staff

Studying abroad is a highlight of the college experience for many, and Providence College has no shortage of global opportunities. Next spring, PC students will have a new option to choose from: studying Catholic theology and culture in Rome.

PC students study abroad through the Center for Global Education (CGE). The CGE offers programs in over 40 countries, allowing students to travel anywhere from South Africa to South Korea.

As listed on their website, the Center has four pedagogical goals:  curricular integration, geographic diversity of program locations, program diversity, and career integration and development. While students may be thousands of miles away from campus, study abroad is an extension of the education at PC. The CGE states that “study abroad provides alternative learning environments so students can benefit from new academic perspectives and intercultural experiences.” 

Italy is not a new destination for PC students looking to study abroad. Since 2013, a popular program has been “PC in Rome,” where students live and study in the Italian capital for a semester. 

Rome has long been a popular destination for visitors, attracting people from all over the world to experience Roman culture. 

One of the city’s main attractions is its history. The center of the ancient world, Rome has thousands of years of rich history, and sites such as the Roman Forum and the Colosseum are still preserved and available to explore. Vatican City to this day is the center of the Catholic Church, and home to the Pope.

It is also known for its art, not only in Vatican City but throughout the city of Rome itself. Rome also has some of the world’s most beautiful architecture, easily spotted throughout the entire city.  

PC’s program will expose students to all of the historical, theological, and artistic culture that Rome has to offer. Among other exciting opportunities, one of the highlights will be experiencing Holy Week and Easter at the Vatican. Faith is at the core of PC, and this program allows students to see it in a new perspective. They will be able to apply the values and experience firsthand the theological ideas taught on campus. 

The new program will be starting in the spring semester of 2020. It will be run by the theology department, and students will have the opportunity to earn credits toward a theology minor. More information will be coming soon.