August 20, 2019

Posts from "Portfolio"

  • Portfolio | May.04, 2017

    Harold

    by Joey Aiello ’17 It was so clear that night it looked as if the sky had been cut open to reveal what it really looks like behind its usual dull mask. Max was a loser. He knew it, but…

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  • Portfolio | May.04, 2017

    Wanderer

    by Abby Johnston ’17 Eighty degrees and bone-dry. Not a cloud overhead to mar the plain of stars. And the concrete driveway that had been baking all day long now felt like a floor-heater on the expanses of back where…

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  • Portfolio | Apr.27, 2017

    Foolishness

    Photo courtesy of Imax.com Julia Zygiel ’19 The sharp wind of early spring buffets Rich and Nina as they settled onto a bench outside of the library to study. Even though it is the first day of spring, it certainly…

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  • Portfolio | Apr.27, 2017

    A Fall From Grace

    Photo courtesy of Pinterest.com Joey Aiello ’17 His brow furrowed as he stared displeasingly at the screen. “It’s not good enough,” he muttered. Neurotically, he subjected his work to round after round of editing. Friends were contacted for advice and…

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  • Portfolio | Apr.06, 2017

    Mr. B.S.

    by Clara Howard ’19 Portfolio Staff Sam’s pretty sure there are times when she hates him. He is, after all, the most frustrating guy she’s ever known. Everything she says is cause for a salty comeback, and God forbid she…

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  • Portfolio | Sep.15, 2016

    Sophie’s Dream of Scipio

    Chennah Sharpe ’17 Portfolio Staff Rain poured down, splashing onto the roof in waves, as if someone was filling a bucket and dumping it down repeatedly on the room. The sound of rain brought her home, and she knew that…

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  • Portfolio | Sep.01, 2016

    The Buzz On Clubs

    by Marisa Gonzalez ’18 “Ok Kimmy. You can do this. Just go up to the big, scary tables with the intimating people. No problem. Just breathe. You can totally do this!” I muttered to myself as I stared at the…

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  • Portfolio | Apr.18, 2013

    River Tide Run

      People like to talk about that moment in their life when they realized that they needed to step things up. That shining moment when they decided to turn their life around, kick that gambling addiction, write the next great American novel, or balance the state budget. For a lot of people, it happened after a near-death moment. I had the near-death moment, but not so much the revelation. Not at first. It should have hit me in the seconds after the car sideswiped my bike and sent me flying. But it didn’t. There was no moment of my life flashing before my eyes, no revelation that I’d led the most bread-and-butter existence in the history of mankind. In fact, my only thought was “what” and the only thing that hit me was the ground. It didn’t hit me when I was propped up against a wall and trying to figure out why my head was bleeding. That was another textbook time for me to have The Moment, but I was in shock at the time. It’s a bit difficult to come to an existential conclusion when all you can do is stare at the mangled wreck of your bike and wonder how big of a dent it left in that car. It didn’t come in the ambulance, either. Again, it was probably the shock. It was hard enough focusing on the paramedics, all of whom were wondering how I’d bashed my forehead open even though I was wearing a helmet. I had been wondering the same thing. I could only hope I wasn’t bleeding to death. Since they didn’t immediately drag me off to surgery when I reached the emergency room, I figured I wasn’t.

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  • Portfolio | Apr.18, 2013

    Runyan v. State (1877)

    I’m going to start off with the assumption that you won’t believe me. No matter what I do to convince you that I was justified in my actions, you’ll see me as a cretin, a low-life, a subhuman waste of flesh and blood with utter disregard and contempt for morality, ethics, goodwill towards men, and humanity as a whole. As far as you’re concerned, I’m barely worth the air that the judge inhaled in order to articulate my condemnation. But how can you judge me when you have only seen me on the cross? You know my nature by the manner in which I fold my hands? Or perhaps it is the finger that I choose to use to scratch my temple that gives me away? Well, I’d have to say that your pressed suit and tie tied as tight as a noose gives away your purpose just as clearly as you perceive mine, but I digress.

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  • Portfolio | Apr.18, 2013

    The Proverbial AHA Moment

      People like to talk about that moment in their life when they realized that they needed to step things up. That shining moment when they decided to turn their life around, kick that gambling addiction, write the next great American novel, or balance the state budget. For a lot of people, it happened after a near-death moment. I had the near-death moment, but not so much the revelation. Not at first. It should have hit me in the seconds after the car sideswiped my bike and sent me flying. But it didn’t. There was no moment of my life flashing before my eyes, no revelation that I’d led the most bread-and-butter existence in the history of mankind. In fact, my only thought was “what” and the only thing that hit me was the ground. It didn’t hit me when I was propped up against a wall and trying to figure out why my head was bleeding. That was another textbook time for me to have The Moment, but I was in shock at the time. It’s a bit difficult to come to an existential conclusion when all you can do is stare at the mangled wreck of your bike and wonder how big of a dent it left in that car. It didn’t come in the ambulance, either. Again, it was probably the shock. It was hard enough focusing on the paramedics, all of whom were wondering how I’d bashed my forehead open even though I was wearing a helmet. I had been wondering the same thing. I could only hope I wasn’t bleeding to death. Since they didn’t immediately drag me off to surgery when I reached the emergency room, I figured I wasn’t.

    Read More